Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
STATION
CNNW 16
MSNBCW 5
CNN 2
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
MSNBC 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
WTTG 1
LANGUAGE
English 33
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
in what's happened over the last couple weeks. but going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. paul. [ inaudible question ] meeting with secretary geithner or your phone call with president obama last night. could you tell us something about that phone call? >> well, we had a very nice conversation last night. it was direct. and straight forward. but this assessment i give you today would be a product of both of those conversations. >> how much would you be open to the idea of discretionary spending cuts as part of a down payment to get to a longer-range solution on entitlements and tax reform? >> there are a lot of options on the table, including that one. >> mr. speaker, before the election, you were asked whether if it obama won taxes would have to go up. and you sounded like you opposed that. now you're acknowledging that they will. >> the day after the election, i came here and made it clear that republicans would put revenue on the table. as a way to begin to move the proces
. yesterday, our leadership team met with her stumbles and business leaders about averting the fiscal cliff and achieving a balanced approach the white house says it wants. i made clear we put real concessions on the line by putting revenues on the table right up front. unfortunately, many democrats continue to roll out sensible spending cuts that must rollup any agreement that will reduce our deficit. mr. bowles himself that there have been no serious discussion of spending cuts so far. unless there is, there is a real danger of going off the cliff. that will hurt our economy and cost american jobs. republicans have taken action to revert the fiscal cliff. to replace the sequestered and paid way for tax reform and entitlement reform. we are the only ones with a balanced plan to protect the economy, protect american jobs and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our countries debt crisis and get our economy going again and create jobs. right now, all eyes are on the white house. our country does not nee
in the business community to make the case as a white house official that if -- without this fiscal cliff situation being resolved, it doesn't give the certainty that not only businesses need to start making investments, to hiring more people, but also middle class americans can't get that comfort that they need to know that their taxes won't go up at the end of the year. and so that's sort of the message that the president is bringing to these business leaders today. but in addition to that, trying to put pressure on them to support his approach, which is those upper income americans need to pay more, ashleigh. >> here is another critical movement. i don't know how critical it is but to me is seemed critical. the president in the bloomberg interview, which is the first interview since the election, it seemed that perhaps he was prepped to make an overture on the insistence to raise tacks on the top 2%. did i hear wrong or read it wrong? that this demand is a temporary demand? >> reporter: yes, it does seem like there's a little wriggle room. jay carney was asked about this and didn't wan
's happened over the last couple of weeks. but going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious, as well. >> all right. so once again, here are the cliff notes right here. republicans on the hill are demanding trillions of dollars worth of debt reduction. that's pretty much fine with democrats who say the wealthy should foot the bill in the form of higher tax rates. and therein lies the catch because the republicans want the savings of federal spending cuts. that dispute blocking efforts to keep rates from rising on everyone. as scheduled on january 1st. this is a so-called fiscal cliff. january 1st. our news makers representative jim clyburn of south carolina, number three democrat in the house of representatives and number one i'm sure to a lot of people. hello. how are you? >> hey, don. thank you so much for having me. >> thanks for coming on. is speaker boehner right, though? as the clock is ticking, ticking toward january 1st, the talks haven't progressed in two weeks. is he right? >> well, i
the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> speaker boehner made very clear at his press conference that he thinks the ball is in your court and the president's court. he says democrats have got to get series about spending cuts. where is the disconnect? >> i don't understand his brain so you should ask him. okay? >> reid making those comments to our own kate bolduan. i'm joined by dan lothian. dan, we're learning more about the white house plan to deal with the fiscal cliff. break it down for us. >> reporter: right. this is the plan that secretary -- treasury secretary timothy geithner took up to capitol hill yesterday. it calls for $1.6 trillion in tax increases over a ten-year period more than republicans had anticipated. in addition to that, $400 billion in spending cuts that will come later. much of that not really specified. we're looking at entitlements such as medicare. and then the plan also includes $50 billion in stimulus spending. democrats see this really as sort of the opening s
over the last couple weeks. going over the fiscal cliff is serious business and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> reporter: you had senate republican leader mitch mcconnell say after a meeting with geithner that he considered this is a step backward. and so all the rhetoric, all the talk here on capitol hill sounds pretty pessimistic at this point, guys. bill: we heard a little bit from chris van hollen. what is the latest reaction from democrats to republicans mike? melissa: democrats say if you don't like the president's plan, republicans where is your plan? where exactly are you going to generate more revenue. they're trying to draw the republicans out to put specifics out there in terms of what cuts they want to make to entitlements, feeling like that may hurt republican argument. bottom line, house democratic leader nancy pelosi says she thinks republicans will eventually see the light. melissa: why am i confident? because it is the right thing to do. the american people expect and deserve this to happen. it
person, everyone talks about what the fiscal cliff could do to small business, what obama care can do for small business, but you said we shouldn't worry about that so much, that we should get some sort of compromise in order to keep moving and keep talking and keep moving forward? >> well, i think that it was pretty clear during the course of the election and since and even in the president's speech today where he said he's willing to give on some revenue and some spending cuts, he's proposed some, he's already passed some into law. and beyond that, just from my perspective, what i see is that we know that we're a confidence-based economy, we're 70% of the economy driven by consumer spending and anything that puts a crimp in consumer spending is not good for the economy. so to put a tax rise, a tax rate increase for the middle class makes no sense to me. someone who makes 50, 60, $70,000 a year will lose and will take away a lot of discretionary purchases from people like me and travel and a whole host of other areas. i hope our leaders in washington are listening and they take the s
there of the business roundtable, the president just getting into the meat of the matter right now, the fiscal cliff issue that's taking a lot of the oxygen out of the room in washington, d.c. i understand we have the shot back up. let's go back to the president. no audio right now? can we show the president? he's actually taken to holding a hand mike so hopefully they'll get the audio issue figured out but we have congressman debbie wasserman schultz 1257bing by, the chair of the dnc and was listening like all of us were to the president and hopefully we'll get the audio issue revolved. congresswoman, good to have you with us. >> thanks, thomas. >> just as we were about to hear what the president was saying with regards to what's taking place in washington, d.c., with you and your colleagues we lost the audio. the vitriol is well established on both sides. the president and john boehner have reportedly not even taken time to speak to each other when face-to-face yesterday at a white house christmas event but it seems both sides can agree that the sky is blue on the one issue when keeping tax cuts w
over the last couple of weeks. but going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> we can debate at length whether the november 6th election was a mandate, but i don't think we can debate the basics that it was a work order, a work order from the american people to members of congress and to the president, roll up your sleeves, work together and solve the problems. we got the message. did speaker boehner get the message? because the message was work together. what we hear from him is all of his pain and frustration and angst dealing with the tea party in his own caucus. well, there comes a point when he needs to look beyond his caucus to the house and to the nation. >> all right. welcome back to "morning joe." >> i guess the more things change, the more they stay the same. it's depressing, you're right, harold, we've seen this movie before. this was a year ago. this happened a year ago. and i know the media says oh, it's the republicans' fault any time the house doesn't co
'm disappointed in where we are. but going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> reporter: house democratic leader nancy pelosi quickly dismissed boehner's remarks as a negotiating maneuver. >> i think they'll come around. it's a tactic. it's a tactic. >> reporter: but you hear a strikingly similar message from other top democratic leaders saying the ball is in the republicans' court. >> we are waiting for some specifics somewhere from our republican colleagues to show that they're serious on negotiations. >> reporter: as the country fast approaches the fiscal cliff, the two sides are talking past each other. democrats say they've laid down their marker hiking tax rates on wealthier americans. and it's up to republicans to propose specific spending cuts they want to entitlement programs. however, republicans say they've offered a concession putting revenue on the table. and they say it's now up to the president and his fellow democrats to feel some pain and propose cuts in medicar
bag, they foolishly lined up behind the wrong guy. they can be a valuable ally in the fiscal cliff push because they're an important component of the republican party. if business leaders come out and recognizing, we've been through the experience of the debt crisis in 2011, business leaders who care about this, have a lot of money on the line, recognize house republicans are willing to go nuts and wreck the economy if you enlist them, you've put additional pressure on republicans to come to the table and agree to a deal that's more along the lines of what democrats and president obama would like to happen. i think there's -- there's something in it for president obama. >> maybe form a daisy chain with the ceo of caterpillar and pepsico and walk around. >> not touching that one. >> interesting optical political kabuki theater. as moderate republicans join the critical corous over susan rice, we'll look at rice resume on "now." so anyway, i've been to a lot of places. you know, i've helped alot of people save a lot of money. but today...( sfx: loud noise of metal object hitting the
with business leaders focusing on ab boarding the fiscal cliff. on capitol hill democrats and republicans are not meeting and a deal does not seem to be close. in a just-released gallup poll, 62% of americans want to see a compromise. 25% want republican and democratic leaders to hold firm on spending cuts and tax increases. major garrett is at the white house this morning. >> reporter: there is a common thread running through all of this. the public wants a deal. so do the governors, mayors, civic leaders, business executives and everyone else who has come through capitol hill and the white house to talk about the fiscal cliff. for the first time since this drama began to play out on a very public stage, yesterday there were no substantive negotiations or conversations whatsoever, none at all. and here is what the public thinks about all this. if, in fact, the nation does go off the fiscal cliff and negative consequences ensue, by a two to one ratio, by the most recent poll, it will blame republican, not the white house. the white house knows this, believes it's in a strong position and
of business. >>> here is what is passing for progress to avoid the fiscal cliff at year's end. president obama and house speaker john boehner spoke about it on the phone with one another. that discussion came as treasury secretary tim geithner confirmed mr. obama is prepared to take the economy over the cliff unless republicans agree to raise tax rates on the wealthy. >>> meantime in georgia, some activists expressed frustration about the stalemate in holiday spirit. they delivered symbolic lumps of kill to the offices of both of their state's u.s. senators. security guard met them, at chambliss' office. a few were let inside without the camera and media present. of course. that would have been the real story. >> folks are upset now. see what happens january 1 after you get the first paycheck and go, oh, this is what the fiscal cliff meant. yeah. 2013. the next story involves a new grassroots campaign that is starting. meant to draw attention to the nation's debt crisis. it is our "favorite story of the day." the campaign is called -- "the can kicks back." aimed at young people and features fo
-called fiscal cliff is a solvable problem. critical as the holidays approach and businesses make investment and hiring decisions for next year. while polls show many americans are pessimistic, there's optimism in this home. >> i got a sense that he's confident that what's best for the american people will happen. >> yeah. >> reporter: you agree? >> yes. >> i do too. >> reporter: but for now, the gop's resisting any tax increases even on those upper income americans. house republicans of course have made the counteroffer with $800 billion in new revenue and an overhaul of the tax code. wolf, they feel as if they have moved the ball, but they don't believe that the president is interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff. >> these negotiations, dan, they usually go until the bitter, bitter end. a lot of folks are assuming that before that end there will be a deal. give us a flavor of the mood at the white house. >> reporter: well, i think they're preparing for this fiscal cliff scenario to play out, wolf. but as you point out when we look back over the last three years, we've had these kinds of n
the american economy. i've been warning you for months about the fiscal cliff, the economic storm of our own making. today, we saw a report indicating that u.s. manufacturing essentially ground to a halt in november. one of the culprits was clearly the uncertainty for business that has been created by this fiscal cliff threat, orders for new goods are flat. factories are cutting workers. this can be fixed. it is reversible. but the signs are clear that the damage is being done. quite a different story by the way over in china where manufacturing output, which had been slowing, picked up in november. it had months of slowdown. now, back to washington. what are the chances that lawmakers in washington will act in time to avert the fiscal cliff? if you go by what both sides are saying right now, not great. >> what we're not going to do is extend the tax cuts for the wealthiest americans. those cost a trillion dollars over ten years and there is no possibility that we're going to find a way to get our fiscal house in order without the tax rates going back up. >> nobody wants to go over the cliff
. >>> americans could be singing the blues if congress doesn't act to avert the fiscal cliff. the longer congress waits the more complicated for businesses to figure out how much to pay workers early next year. the confusion could cost employers money, especially small businesses which use payroll software which takes time away from running their business. starbucks ceo howard schultz agrees. >> this single issue has a seismic affect on the rest of the world that we have never been as connected in the domino effect of a bad outcome here will have significant negative consequences domestically and around the world. >> negative consequences, seismic or not, none is stopping starbucks plans for 1,500 more cafes across america next year. and just as many around the world. but we get his point. >>> speaking of the fiscal cliff, we know what the parameters of a deal in congress will look like, right? on taxes, republicans give in to raise taxes on the wealthiest 2% and democrats will agree to rein in tax breaks, right? democrats are fighting hard to preserve the tax deduction for state and local taxes,
speaker, john boehner, both expressing optimism on those fiscal cliff negotiations in washington. the dow rallied 100 points yesterday off of those comments. how many times have you heard me say congress will mess it up. >>> goldman sachs ceo met with the president and others yesterday for those fiscal cliff talks. listen to what he told wolf blitzer when asked if taxes should be raised on those making more than $250,000 a year. if that's what it takes to make the math work when you look at entitlement side and revenue side, i wouldn't preclude that. of course we would have to do that if the numbers drive that way. >> he said america can't afford itself right now the way we're going. fiscal cliff talks today continue with geithner making the rounds on capitol hill. later this morning, third quarter gdp expected to be revised higher. economists expect gdp for july to september to be revised from 2% to 2.8%. that would be good news. this is still modest growth. everyone hopes that next year will be a better year than this one in terms of growth. you want to see more than 2.5% growth consist
house is prepared to go off the fiscal cliff, unless the republicans bend on taxes. comment by former democratic presidential candidate howard dean frightened republics that this debate is not just about raising taxes on the rich. >> the truth is, even needs to pay more taxes. not just the rich. that is a good start. we are not getting out of the deficit problem unless we raise taxes across the board and go back to what bill clinton have. >> some liberals pushed the president to raise the debt ceiling himself, claiming he has executive power through the 14th amendment. jay carney reveals today the white house studied that, does not believe the president has the power. that means we are headed for another major showdown with congress over the debt ceilin ceiling. >> bret: more with the panel. ed henry, thank you. republicans are losing one of the most conservative voices on capitol hill. south carolina senator jim demint surprised a lot of people today when he announced he is leaving the senate. but staying in washington to run the conservative heritage foundation think tank. he joins
don't know what the fiscal cliff is, you've probably been living under a rock. i found this explanation. this is mr. burns from the simpsons. >> think of the economy as a car and the rich man is the driver. if you don't give the driver all the money, he'll drive you over a cliff. it is just -- >> what actually will happen if america does head toward that fiscal cliff? and go over it even temporarily? cnn money's jean zahadi has been on this story from the very beginning. here is the question at hand. a lot of people are saying, what happens if we don't get a deal right by the end of december and we get into early january, maybe go over the cliff for a week or two? is that catastrophic? >> it doesn't have to be. there are steps the government can take to mitigate the impact of the spending cuts and the tax increases. but legislative and budget experts i talked to say that really assumes a lot of things. one, that congress will act quickly, which can it do if it wants to, but, you know, can they cut a deal in january that they couldn't cut in december? that's one question
on fiscal cliff negotiation struck a much different tone. if republicans don't but specifically tax rates on upper earners the white house is ready to go right over the cliff. >> we see there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2%. >> largely backs the president on those rates. 48% support the plan to raise them on upper earners compared to 32% of leaving rates unchanged. when it comes to government spending, the gop has the edge. to help balance the budget, spending cuts should take precedence over tax hikes, 46 to 30%. and leaders in congress who met with business leaders say they have already offered to raise tax by cutting deductions and the president has yet to counter their proposal. >> i'll be here and available at any moment to sit down with the president if he gets serious about solving this problem. >> it's possible the white house may be bluffing, the administration did order the pentagon to consider the big cuts in military spending that would happen if we don't reach an agreement. in washington, doug luzader, fox news. >> stocks
with this fiscal cliff, of course, that's the great unknown. but it is making a lot of business leaders very, very nervous. christine romans, she spoke with one ceo who says leaders in washington, they're focused on the wrong issue. >> i asked the outspoken ceo of fedex how companies plan ahead when washington is so dysfunctional. >> well, i think most of the ceos look at the situation in washington with complete amazement and dismay to be frank about it. the problem is the ideological pinnings on both sides of this argument are so difficult to bridge that it's going to be hard for them to get a deal. >> this is a time when companies should be planning for next year. spending money, buying equipment, building factories, hiring workers. instead they have no idea what tax rates will be and whether congress will spark a new recession. and companies are already pulling back. you can see that in the third quarter gdp report. companies spending on software and equipment fell almost 3% in the quarter. we haven't seen that since the recession. s i asked fred smith if he would accept higher taxes to get a
it if we come it to a deal with the fiscal cliff and get economic growth and get people investing, inflation will go up. so that is going to be a problem for american families. like you said, there are places that business can succeed. is it government-infused money to get there, or is it going to be actual, real, american dollars in there? >> susan, that's really the opportunity. first of all, i don't think inflation is a concern for years. in order for inflation to be a concern it it has to get into the wage cycle. we're far from that. the needs are clear. ports, roads, transport rail and plus protection against extreme weather. on the other side demand. the demand for infrastructure investments isle coming from the private sector. this is very new and it's driven by the fact as rates come down the opportunities for investors, pension funds and sovereign wealth funds to find opportunities to give them the yield they want, 5 to 6% are disappearing. infrastructure offers that opportunity. it's a long-term opportunity. it matches their liabilities, what they need to protect to pay
comments made by president obama and house speaker john boehner, both expressing optimism on fiscal cliff negotiations in the washington. in a new report from the congressional budget office it says more than half a trillion has been spent on jobless benefits over the past five years. $520 billion in jobless benefits in five years. also part of the debate, whether to extend the deadline to file for additional unemployment benefits beyond the end of the year. spending on food stamps is rising. nearly 15 million households received food stampses in 2011, up 10% from the year before according to new data from the census bureau. it shows you the far reach of the government right now in the safety net in supporting american families. all of that at the core of the debate of what's happening with the fiscal cliff. >>> $7 coffee. starbucks thinks you will pay. coffee connoisseurs can pay $7 for a grande cup of costa rica fincapalamara. it's called mucho deneiro. cultivated from a central american bean known as geisha. it is extremely difficult to produce. the same america who spends $7 on lotter
, then they're going to risk the whole economy in going over the fiscal cliff. i don't think that's sustainable. i don't think people fully understand, what the president is saying is 100% of american families and small businesses get continued tax relief on their first $250,000 in income, and on the income above that amount, higher income people would be paying the same rates they did during the clinton administration, which is four more cents on the dollar. and, again, i don't think that's at all unreasonable. the president talked about this at length during the presidential campaign, and i believe -- i think people like tom cole, a conservative republican in oklahoma had it right when he warned his colleagues they would look totally obstructionist if they allowed that to happen. >> congressman, also included in the president's plan was that $200 billion in new stimulus measures. mention the word stimulus to republicans, and, well, they're not too happy with that word. so why do that? why deliberately like -- it seems like it was a deliberate poke in the side. >> no, carol. this
a little bit. gridlock in washington over the fiscal cliff making stock investors really nervous. stocks are acting unpredictable. so watch out ahead here. companies should be making hiring and spending plans for next year. instead they're left wondering whether consumers are going to take home less money, and that government agencies can slash spending. a recipe for recession. i asked the ceo of fedex how companies plan ahead when washington is so dysfunctional. >> well i think most of the ceos look at the situation in washington with complete amazement and dismay, to be frank about it. the problem is, the ideological pinnings on both sides of this argument are so difficult to bridge, that it's going to be hard for them to get a deal. >> that's right. other ceos i talked to yesterday said they think it will be hard to get a deal, soledad and it's kind of a grim move right now in d.c. about how long it's going to take -- >> xavier becerra, it sounded like compromise could be on the table because they're going to come to this cliff deadline that will put pieces in place that maybe just ha
the recovery started. now, i'm not going to blame it all on the fiscal cliff. we have a slowing economy. we have slowing economies around the world. but i was at a dinner with a bunch of ceos in washington who are interested and care about this fiscal issue on monday night. and they were talking about we're not hiring. we're allowing attrition to happen. we're holding back on big spending. we want to see what happens here before we go forward. what's interesting about this is that the consumer seems to have a different view. the consumer -- for the consumer so far, this has sort of passed by. i wouldn't say blissful ignorance, but it has not affected their behavior. you had a fairly strong set of economic numbers this fall. the housing market seems to have finally turned up after a period of obviously deep decline. and so consumer confidence, which is one of our best proxies for this kind of thing, has been turning up and really does not yet -- the fiscal cliff does not yet seem to have penetrated their consciousness. for those of us who were in stores over the holiday weekend, stores are c
is listen to their constituents wrrn it's important to note that families are struggling. having a fiscal cliff situation, going on inside the beltway, has a rippling reprecussions for people outside the beltway. we heard stories from people like ruthy who shared with us that her husband is a small business owner. he runs a catering company. because of the economic downturn, he has had fewer clients, which has meant they cannot make ends meet on her salary at a nonprofit and his salary to raise their two children, and, in fact, their phone was recently turned off. they're very concerned about having to pay more taxes just because congress can't end this fiscal cliff fiasco. >> you might have misunderstood the question. what do you think the mom kz do? what do you think, you know, families can do or should be doing to try to help the situation, obviously, because you've got some people who argue, well, you know, maybe there ought to be major cuts when it comes to medicare or medicaid or reforming social security, that kind of thing? >> well, we absolutely 1150% are hearing from moms across
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)